Exchanging Remotes for Reins..

Post by Melody Garner-Skiba
Rocking Heart Ranch

Every day each of us gets a little older. It does not matter what industry you work in or what job you do, days go by so quickly and none of us get any younger. This is especially important to remember if you want to ensure your way of life, your business, and your passion will continue long after you are gone. The horse industry is not immune to this circle and unless we get our kids to exchange remotes for a set of reins, we could find ourselves in a bit of a conundrum down the road.

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It is with this potential pitfall down the road, that our ranch started to work on a vision of getting Youth Back in the Saddle several years ago. Our mission is to encourage up and comers of all ages to get involved in the industry and contribute to ensuring this way of life that we all love will be around for future generations. One of the projects that our ranch is undertaking to meet this vision, is our 60-day Colt Starting Challenge. This challenge focuses on promoting up and coming trainers who are trying to ensure that people of all ages get back into the saddle and stay in the saddle! Continue reading “Exchanging Remotes for Reins..”

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Mules & Ponies

Some things just catch your fancy.

Like a Mule and Donkey Show.

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or how about a Pony Show?

Alvesta Sedona, yearling Welsh Section B (Llanarth Tarquin x Alvesta Fairy Lustre) was 2017 overall Welsh Gelding Champion. Owned by Alvesta Farm; shown by Karen Podolski. Michelle Walerius Photography.

Alvesta Sedona, yearling Welsh Section B (Llanarth Tarquin x Alvesta Fairy Lustre) was 2017 overall Welsh Gelding Champion. Owned by Alvesta Farm; shown by Karen Podolski. Michelle Walerius Photography.

I was reading through the events section on Northernhorse when it struck me that these might be fun “things to do” for almost anyone.  Continue reading “Mules & Ponies”

Results of Western Fortunes Incentive

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Yellow Rose Futurity & Derby – Claresholm, Alberta Canada – May 5-6, 2018 Results

Western Fortunes would like to thank everyone who participated in our first event, the Yellow Rose Futurity, Derby and Open on May 5-6, 2018.

Also, we’d like to extend special congratulations to Kareen Warren and her mare, Miss Coronaboon sired by Boonlit and out of Corona Lina (Corona For Me* x Dinah Carolina). They dominated the competition, winning every WF round, pocketing $1890.00
for the owner and breeder!

We’re so pleased at how successful our first event was and we can’t wait for the rest of the season! Good luck, everyone! Continue reading “Results of Western Fortunes Incentive”

Cascade The Wildie – What’s My Story?

My brother and I got kicked out of our herd by the herd stallion who had enough of our shenanigans. It was fun at first roaming around in the forests and meadows but soon we wanted some company and found a beautiful mare.

Unfortunately she lived on private land and we were not welcome. With the help of the rancher and the kind folks at WHOAS, we were encouraged to get into a trailer and came to their rescue facility just west of Sundre.

Cascade the Wild Horse is Ready for Adoption

At first we were frightened but our caretakers are patient and have years of experience in helping wild horses adjust to captivity. It starts with them bringing us lots of good food and water. Before you know it we had halters on and began to trust these humans who did not want to harm us.
Cascade is a wild horse who is looking for a forever home
Now you should see me. I look forward to being led into the barn twice a day where I get more good food. I can be brushed and touched and its okay. I have been gelded, had my wolf teeth removed, vaccinated and wormed. I have also been freeze branded (W or H right hip) so if I ever get lost or stolen I can be found again. My brother is already adopted but I am still waiting for someone to take me to my forever home.

Is that person you?

Cascade is ready for adoption. Contact WHOAS at WHOASalberta@gmail.com and arrange to come out and see him. He is not going to be a big horse, maybe 14.1 hh but is strong with good feet. We have found these wildies are quick learners and bond quickly with their new owners. He is only 2 1/2 years old – a perfect time to begin to develop a riding horse.

If Cascade isn’t the Wildie of Your Dreams, maybe you would like to leave your name on our list of potential adopters should another wildie becomes available. We would like to hear from you.

Would you like to learn more about the wild horses of Alberta? Would you like to keep up to date with what is happening with them?

Visit https://wildhorsesofalberta.com/

Have you ever seen, met or ridden a wild horse? Be sure to tell us about it in the comments if you have.

Previous Wild Horse Posts on Northernhorse Blog:

Drone Footage of Alberta’s Wild Horses

3 Canadians Among the 2017 AQHA Legacy Breeders

News Release: CQHA

2017 has been a very good year in terms of recognizing Canadian breeders of American Quarter Horses. This year, Gordon B. Mason of Killarney, Manitoba, Pat and Eddy Sparks of Taber, Alberta, and Donald A. Woitte of Clive, Alberta were invited to an AQHA Hall of Fame and Museum ceremony in Amarillo, Texas to accept their Breeder Legacy Awards for having registered at least one foal for 50 consecutive years. The Mason family was able to attend the ceremony Unfortunately the Sparks family and Woitte family were unable to attend due to health issues.

CQHA congratulates these pioneers in our industry and invites you to visit the history section of our website to view the Lists of Canadian AQHA Legacy Breeders over the years, in two categories: those who have registered foals for 50 consecutive years; and those who have registered foals for 50 cumulative years.

DONALD & IRENE WOITTE, CLIVE, AB, CA

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“The horse operation started as a hobby, but developed into a first-class business for my wife and myself,” he says. “We don’t have a large operation. It’s small compared to what most breeding operations are. At our peak, we ran about 45 horses a year – including about 20 broodmares – and now we’re down to about 15 horses, including eight broodmares. But we’ve done this a long time. We’ve bred about 800 mares during our 50 years in the business, some of them our own mares and some were outside mares.”

The Woittes call their operation Fintry Quarter Horses, named for a historic ranch that Don’s father cowboyed on near Kelowna, British Columbia. The first horse they registered under the name was Fintry Tom Cat, a 1967 sorrel stallion by Old Tom Cat. Horses that contributed to the Fintry program include Zella Hep, a 1954 mare by Leo’s full brother Tucson A that was out of Panita Lass by Little Joe The Wrangler, and she became the dam of AQHA Champion Jay Page and Leozella, a good show mare. Others were J A Bar Tango, a King Leo Bar mare who was the reserve junior performance mare in Alberta as a 4-year-old in 1972; and Fintry Miss Wimpy, Fintry Catechu Dan, Fintry Blue Ambrose and Fancy Partner, a Superior halter mare by Fintry Tom Cat who produced top-notch ranch horses.

Read more at the CQHA website: https://cqha.ca/history/legacy-breeders/18-cqha-history/132-legacy-breeders-woitte

PAT & EDDY SPARKS, TABER, AB, CA

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“When I first started attending rodeos in the late ‘40s, I was impressed by the horses that the timed-event cowboys were riding,” Eddy says. “They called them Texas Quarter Horses. Then, through the ‘50s, I broke and trained some of those horses for people who had acquired breeding stock from the States. A lot of those were by or descendants of Sleepy Cat, a son of Red Dog, that Jack Casement bred out of a Sheep mare. When I started calf roping at rodeos in the ‘50s, it was those kind of horses that I wanted to ride and use.”

Those horses also taught him what constitutes a really good horse.

“My ideal horse would be 15 or 15.1 hands, weighing around 1,100 pounds,” he says. “He has to have good withers and a short back, long shoulders and hips, a clean neck and a nice head with a big, soft eye. He should have good feet and legs, be low in the hocks with short cannons, with Size 0 shoes and well-rounded, dark hooves. Color is not really important, but I do not like too many white hooves.”

Read more at the CQHA Website: https://cqha.ca/history/legacy-breeders/18-cqha-history/131-legacy-breeders-sparks

GORDON B. MASON, KILLARNEY, MB, CA

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American Quarter Horses have long been a fixture in the lives of Gordon and Gladys Mason, pioneers of the American Quarter Horse industry in Canada.

The Masons established their farm when the breed’s popularity began to grow in their home province of Manitoba. At peak production, the Masons owned approximately 68 broodmares, a considerable growth from their 17-head herd in 1966. Since 2010, they have downsized significantly, and currently have one stallion and six broodmares.

Although the Masons stood 10 stallions during their 50 years of breeding, one sire – their first – was particularly influential in their program. Mr. Blackburn 49, a 1963 bay stallion by Poco Eagle and out of Lady Cowan by Blackburn, who was shown in halter and reining, laid the foundation for their operation, siring nearly 300 offspring.

Read more at the CQHA Website: https://cqha.ca/history/legacy-breeders/18-cqha-history/130-legacy-breeders-mason

Photos provided by the breeders’ families, Northernhorse & AQHA
Text Content provided by AQHA